"MADE IN CUBA / HECHO EN CUBA: REYCLING MEMORY AND CULTURE, PART II" AT SQUIRREL HAUS ARTS IN MINNEAPOLIS NOVEMBER 18-JANUARY 14, 2018 FEATURES 70 ARTISTS EXPLORING A WIDE RANGE OF THEMES


FLYER


MINNEAPOLIS - From November 18, 2017 to January 14, 2018, anyone interested in Cuban art and culture will have the rare chance to see, and acquire, works of 70 Cuban artists in a colorful setting much like one might experience visiting galleries and art centers in Havana. "Made in Cuba! Recycling Memory and Culture, Part II" at Squirrel Haus Arts (3450 Snelling Avenue, Minneapolis, 55406) will feature art from the 1960s to the present.


The work includes photography and posters, folk art, paintings, drawings, prints, small sculpture, ceramics and wearable art, and themes that range from the political to the spiritual to everyday Cuban life, to exploring one’s inner angels and demons.   


For the opening night, November 18, from 3 to 11 p.m., Squirrel Haus Arts will become a mini-version of Havana’s famed Fábrica del Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory), with Cuban music and movies, snacks and drinks, as well as the many forms of art present throughout the show. The exhibit's regular hours will be 12 to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday.


The abundant work stems from The Cuban Art Space of New York’s Center for Cuban Studies (CCS) and is curated by the CCS team of  Sandra Levinson (a CCS founder), Bernardo Navarro and Juan Carlos Tamargo. Tamargo will be in Minneapolis to create the exhibit, and Levinson will be here for gallery talks. "Made in Cuba! Recycling Memory and Culture, Part II will include some artists featured in a parallel Cuban Art show at the Walker Art Center, "Adios Utopia" (November through March).


"In many ways, this show is an extension, a response, and a counter-comment to the Walker’s exhibit, and one part of the exhibit is devoted to artists being shown at the Walker, " says Levinson, who lives part-time in Cuba. "There is no hard-and-fast political theme in this exhibit. Rather, it’s intended to present a broader vision of Cuban art. Included in the show, for example, is self-taught and outsider art, art forms rarely shown as part of Cuban gallery or museum exhibits."


Levinson notes that much of the art in the Walker exhibit is from private collections in the U.S. "The Center for Cuban Studies is responsible for the fact that original Cuban art can be brought into the U.S. legally: it spearheaded a lawsuit in 1991 against the U.S. Treasury Department, which it won. Prior to that time, the U.S. government treated original art coming from Cuba as an illegal import."